Sustainable Denim: RE: Jeans Goes Green

sustainable denim

South African retailer, Woolworths is leading the way locally in terms of producing a sustainable denim brand.

Introducing RE: F.I.T and RE: cycled jeans, Woolies’s new sustainable denim range, made using 100% African cotton.

Woolworths teamed up with WWF-SA and Green House to find the most sustainable way to make the new “green” jeans and found that they could drastically decrease water usage and reduce the amount of chemicals used in the regular denim production process.

Fashioning a sustainable future

This is a big move for sustainable denim and sustainable fashion in South Africa. Not only has this process reduced energy and water usage in the company’s denim production process by more than half, but Woolworths have also switched to using environmentally friendly chemicals in the dyeing process and are using 100% African cotton in the sustainable denim range.

Following on international trends, the men’s RE: cycled denim jeans are made using recycled plastic bottles.

sustainable denim

Find out more about the RE: Denim Journey to Sustainability in the video below.

[youtube_sc url=”http://youtu.be/Y4LRrnLA4Yc” title=”RE:%20denim%20sustainable%20denim%20woolworths”]

 

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6 Comments

  • Cotton is not green. Local is lekker, but cotton consumes huge amount of water and uses toxic herbicides and pesticides unless it is certified organic. Bravo for non-toxic dyes. Recycled PET is still plastic. Where do the jeans end up? In landfill. They are stillplastic, but made to look different for a while. Plastics manufacturers will keep on dreaming up ways to use recycled plastic so that they can carry on making more and more. Classic greenwashing. Hemp would be a win/win in all the above respects.

    • So recycled polyster (plastic bottles) replacing virgin cotton and polyester isn’t a good thing?
      Jeans don’t generally end up in landfill in South Africa…

      No scaled up hemp sourcing in SA – is it not still illegal..

      • Legal experimental hemp farms in Eastern Cape need support from
        initiatives like this. Government not following through as planned.
        Money spent on recycling PET should rather be sent on developing
        processing plants for the hemp. Unfortunately no money in this for
        plastic manufacturers. However, imported hemp fabric readily available,
        albeit with carbon footprint; will outlast both the cotton and the
        quasi “green” PET jeans. So where do old jeans in SA go after the last
        hand-me-down?

  • Legal experimental hemp farms in Eastern Cape need support from initiatives like this. Government not following through as promised. Money spent on recycling PET should rather be sent on developing processing plants for the hemp. Unfortunately no money in this for plastic manufacturers. However, imported hemp fabric readily available, albeit with carbon footprint; will outlast both the cotton and the quasi “green” PET jeans. So where do old jeans in SA go after the last hand-me-down?

  • same debate with the vegan shoes… we don’t feed the meal industry, which is one of the most pollutant, but in the other hand, materials uesd instead are pollutant…

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